Five Ways to Expand the Current Star Wars Universe

Five Ways to Expand the Current Star Wars Universe

Hi folks, Nathan here, filling in for Kiri while she gets into the groove of this whole motherhood thing. All the best to Kiri and her little Jedi as they start this journey. May the Force be with you for sure!

Okay, so let’s talk about the old Expanded Universe. It was just over two years ago that this collection of novels, comics, and game narratives loved (and occasionally loathed) by Star Wars fans was relegated to the status of “Legends”. In that time, a great deal of digital ink has been spilled decrying Disney’s decision as well as talking about all the critical pieces of the EU that should have been kept canon.

And none of it has mattered. At the end of the day, I understand why Disney made this call. The EU became a convoluted collection of Galaxy ending disasters occurring every other week and an indistinguishable knot of interpersonal relationships. Some of it had to be jettisoned in order to create stories that were still fresh and compelling and accessible to new audiences.

However, the EU was still home to a bunch of great ideas. No small indication of that is how The Force Awakens borrowed some of them, at least conceptually, to fill out its characters and places. One example is Starkiller Base which certainly recalls The Sun Crusher. And of course there’s the reveal that Kylo Ren is in fact Jacen Solo, er, I mean Ben…

In the wake of The Force Awakens, I want to look at aspects of the EU that are ideas that can still be used to fill out that Galaxy far, far away. The idea here isn’t that Disney should lift these five things whole cloth from the pages of our favorite Star Wars novels. Rather, I believe these five concepts should be used to help flesh out the new canon, even if not in the exact form we’re familiar with.

Lando’s Bad Luck

You remember the bustling mineral business from Nomad City on Nkllon? Or the Galaxy famous theme parks of Cloud City? Or the time Lando fought a rancor for priceless Meek artifacts?

No? That’s because in the EU Lando had a long history of betting big, and failing bigger. It was part of the old space pirate’s enduring charm. He was always out for the big score, even if that was going to land him in more trouble than it was worth.

It does appear that so far in canon stories of Lando will fall along the same vein. His appearance on the Rebels show involved many shenanigans leading to the revelation that he’s going to be using puffer pigs to root out valuable minerals. Also the Lando comic series (I’ll be talking more about this soon!) starts with Lando acquiring a certain trinket to pay off a debt, only to have the term familiarly “altered” at the last minute. Let’s keep Lando out in front of some of the Galaxy’s most magnificent schemes, and maintaining his winning smile when the dust settles from the eventual crash.

Black Sun and Prince Xizor

In the late 90’s, Lucasfilm was looking thinking about releasing new Star Wars films into the world. There were ideas floating around, but the Prequels were still a few years off. The media company had formed many relationships in the nearly two decades since the Original Trilogy, but questions were being asked how these various media entities could work around a single big release. Could they work in conjunction to release materials in multiple formats that would compliment each other and continue to build on the Star Wars fan base? The answer to those questions was the Shadows of the Empire multimedia project.

It started as an experiment to see if Lucasfilm and its partners were ready for a major motion picture release. For the first time, we as fans received new stories that explored the period between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. We were introduced to new heroes and new villains. Among those were the Black Sun crime syndicate and its indomitable leader, Prince Xizor.

Black Sun exists within the current canon. They were a faction with Darth Maul’s Shadow Collective, but I feel like they lack some of the teeth they had when introduced through Shadows of the Empire. Perhaps that has to do with the enigmatic, over the top Prince Xizor. Xizor was written to be the ultimate badass. And while I don’t think the canon needs a character exactly like him (pure evil complete with rapey seduction pheromones), a powerful crime lord that rivals the Hutts and is confident enough to scheme around the Emperor would be a very cool addition.

The Courtship of Princess Leia

The Courtship of Princess Leia was the first EU novel I read as teenager. The story of a lovesick Han Solo essentially kidnapping Leia, to woo her on a planet he won in an underground sabacc game. A planet that just happens to be home to rancors and a lost race of “magical” force users that leads to squaring off against the strongest of the Imperial Remnant, Warlord Zsinj. All the while Han is pursued by Luke and the jilted Prince Isolder attempting to prevent civil war within the fledgling New Republic.

It was truly a soap opera in space writ large, and I devoured it as a young Star Wars fan. Courtship was a fun, fast read. It had its flaws and these days doesn’t rank quite as high among my favorite EU novels, but it was really my first big introduction to the EU and for that it will always be adored.

What I would love to keep from The Courtship of Princess Leia is that it is going to take a big, raucous adventure, and maybe risking everything our heroes have fought to build, for Han to admit his feelings and decide to ask Leia to marry him. Because one thing about Han Solo, and this has been established in the canon, its going to take an awful lot for him to consider family life. You know.

Grand Admiral Thrawn and the Chiss.

You knew he would make the list. Grand Admiral Thrawn is one of the most enduring elements of the EU. Timothy Zahn’s seminal trilogy elevated the Expanded Universe. No small part of that was due to the strength of Thrawn as such a fascinating character. He was a brilliant strategist and a blue skinned alien that had risen to Grand Admiral in the notoriously xenophobic Empire. Next to perhaps the reborn Emperor, Thrawn was the Empire’s best chance at reestablishing its former glory.

With the First Order’s clear similarities to the Empire, it seems obvious that the Imperial Remnant didn’t fade away after the events Return of the Jedi. Having a strong, brilliant presence similar to Grand Admiral Thrawn would go a long way to explaining the Empire’s continued influence 30 years later.

If that character were to have ties to a mysterious faction in the Outer Rim that has its eyes set upon extending its dominance into the Core Worlds, that would add even more intrigue. The Chiss Ascendancy would be a fascinating foil to both the plans of the Alliance and Empire.

Add to that the fact that Luke, Leia, and Han appear to have a less influential roles in the Galaxy after Ben Solo’s betrayal, and threats from the Imperial Remnants and the Chiss would require a new set of heroes to face them. Some of those heroes could be members of…

Rogue Squadron

Talk to me about Star Wars fandom, and it won’t take long for me to reveal my love for Rogue Squadron. I’ve said before that Wedge Antilles is possibly my favorite character. He certainly is outside of the Original Trilogy’s main heroes. In my late teens and early twenties, I just could not get enough of these scrappy men and women who accomplished the impossible without any Force to aid them (mostly). They relied solely on their Incom T-65 X-wings, their exceptional skill on the stick, and each other. Corran Horn said it best, “I’m with Rogue Squadron. Impossible is our stock in trade, and success is what we deliver.”

Rogue Squadron does exist in the current canon. Technically. It was the designation used by Luke and Wedge’s snowspeeder group on Hoth. I’m going to be watching the development of Rogue One very closely. I hope the use of the moniker there can somehow develop into a collection of the Rebellion’s best fighter pilots. I also like what I’ve seen of Black Squadron in the Poe Dameron comic series, but it’s not quite the same to me. I’m really hoping for a Star Wars universe that includes the Rogues.

What about you? What from the Expanded Universe would you like to see make the jump to Disney’s current canon at least conceptually?

Haiku Me Friday! Scout Trooper Cloud City Edition

Good, good things going on in my life right now guys…which is much needed since the first half of this year has been like I  was thrown unexpectedly into the Rancor pit.  I feel like I’ve finally fought him off and I’m catching a break.  Not sure if I killed the Rancor yet, I guess that will only become clear later, but right now I’m breathing better than I have in a long time and feel good about the way my life is headed.  You know what I mean?

Do you ever have that instance where you write about 4 paragraphs and just delete it all?  Yeah, that just happened.

Onto Friday fun!  Happy Friday everyone!

We creep in slowly Do we pass on by or shoot? It’s hard to decide

We creep in slowly
Do we pass on by or shoot?
It’s hard to decide

My first thought was, “Since when would scout troopers ever be needed on Cloud City?”  This picture completely baffled me so I looked up some more information on scout troopers over at Wookiepedia (to think that I used to buy new editions of Star Wars encyclopedias whenever they came out!  I was constantly buying the latest editions because the EU was always changing. Now we have the internet and I am so thankful):

Scout troopers, light armored and far more mobile than regular stormtrooper units, were usually assigned to planetary garrisons where they patrolled perimeters, performed reconnaissance missions and identified enemy positions. As scouts, their mission profile often positioned them far from Imperial resupply. As a result, the scout troopers received special training in order to become efficient survivalists who were equipped with an array of equipment and supplies to aid in their military role.

Okay, so here I’ve been for the past 17 years of my life thinking that scout troopers only served in forest-like locations due to Return of the Jedi.  This is where I know I have huge gaps in my Star Wars knowledge.

I like to think I know a lot, and yes, compared to an average human, I do know way more about Star Wars than I should.  But I am the first to admit that my knowledge is very limited and it’s starting to bother me.  I focus on what I love most: the Jedi and how they inadvertently brought down the destruction of the Republic, the tormented feelings of Padmé, Palpatine’s master scheming, and mostly just detailed movie knowledge.

I know very little about the Empire and focus very little on their troops, systems, organization, and politics.  Over the past year and a half, I have made a concentrated effort to read more Star Wars novels (though I swore I never would lol) that are now canon and be more open minded about parts of Star Wars that just don’t interest me.  For instance, one of my goals this year is to watch Attack of the Clones and find 10 things I like about it.  Notice that I still have not done it yet?  I keep procrastinating.

But this news about the scout troopers really interests me because I had no idea how specialized they were.  Anyone with half a brain could have figured it out, because, well, “scout” is in their title.  “Scout” does not equal “forest” last time I checked.  This knowledge of scout troopers being so specialized really does open up a whole new world of imagination for me.  They were complete idiots in ROTJ, but perhaps that was an anomaly.  I kind of want to be a scout trooper and go on cool missions.

So when does this picture take place?  ESB?  Well, that doesn’t make complete sense because it sounds like the Empire made a straight out deal with Lando so there would be no need for them to sneak around.  Do you think these scout troopers are going to actually kill the guy sleeping on duty?  Or do you think they already shot him?

What’s your passion when it comes to Star Wars?  Have you ever been surprised by information you’ve taken for granted?  Have you ignored other aspects of the Star Wars universe because you like something else so much more?

8 Reasons I Loved the Star Wars Rebels Season Two Premiere

I’m honestly in shock at how much I liked the SWR season 2 premiere that aired this past weekend.  Not that I didn’t like Season One (you can see my thoughts here and here), but I thought the beginning of Season Two blew all of Season One out of the water.  I kind of wish I went to see it at SWCA with all the other fans now.

Here’s what was downright awesome about the premiere.

  1. Darth Vader. I was really, really nervous going into Season 2 that they would try to humanize Vader in some formdarth vader ezra SWR season 2 because, well, this is a kid’s show at the heart of it.  But they didn’t.  He was evil and ruthless and whooped both Kanan and Ezra’s butt.  When they fought him in the end, I thought there was no way the writers could have both escape without compromising Vader.  They couldn’t defeat him (they are both not even close to strong enough in the Force or Jedi training to take him on); nor would he let them easily escape.  Filoni and his team did a great job by letting Kanan and Ezra escape but still showing Vader as the complete badass that he is.
  2. Ahsoka did not have much screen time. Don’t get me wrong – I love Ahsoka and I’m so glad she’s back.  But this is a new storyline with new characters.  While I’m happy she’s back, I’m also extremely pleased to see she is less feisty and quieter, which shows character development and I’m happy she is not central to the Rebels team.
  3. There was dissention within the Ghost crew. Now, this was no mutiny but I think it’s smart to show children, and us, that working with a team is not always perfect. Kanan did not want to be part of the Rebellion…he wanted to be on their own again, whereas Hera wanted to be part of the larger cause.  She spoke to Kanan about it quietly on the side and maturely.  When he stormed off, she didn’t push the matter.  I really admired that.  Further, she later brought the subject up with the whole team to see what everyone thought.  Stay with the Rebellion or continue solo as they had been?  The vote was 3 to 2 to stay with the team.  But it showed us an important lesson that working as a team means that sometimes there are disagreements on how to move forward and talking about it without getting angry is a good way to resolve matters.
  4. Ezra showed major character development. Ezra is an awesome character and those that disagree clearly don’t remember what it was like to be a child.  He’s is slowly figuring out right versus wrong, good versus bad, just like many of the children watching the show.  He wants to be a Jedi, but he struggles in grasping the Force and controlling his anger.  Sometimes he’s unsure if he even wants to be part of the team, but in this first episode we saw him realize that there’s more to life than just him and his friends.  There’s a bigger cause and sometimes it’s worth fighting for, even if it means helping someone who was once your enemy (Minister Tua) and you’re unsure if they can be trusted.
  5. It was good, classic Star Wars fun, very similar to the OT. Throughout this episode, there were moments where I was just nervous and on-edge, not knowing how it would turn out, especially when they were trying to get off of Lothal.  Vader was this looming presence that seemed to guess their next move at every turn, something I was not used to with SWR.  I’m used to the good guys winning and getting away with it, with their cocky assuredness.  That was not the case with this episode.  Yes, they got away, but it was not a victory.
  6. The Empire is cruel. In this episode we see Minister Tua blown up and killed as she enters her ship because she contacted the Rebellion for help.  It’s also used as a trap to extract and possibly capture the Ghost   Later, we see an entire town burned to the ground.  Though the show was clear in pointing out that they had taken all the citizens out before burning it, I don’t think that’s what happened.  I think that’s what they had to say because it’s on Disney but the sense I got from it was they burned the entire town, civilians included.  It drives home the point that the Empire was an oppressive government and to take it on would be a huge undertaking.
  7. What about the people just doing their job? I always think I would be a character similar to Minister
    I'm just trying to do my job!

    I’m just trying to do my job!

    Tua if I lived in the Star Wars universe.  I would be good at my job, enough to get me promoted and make me think I have some power.  I would probably help the Empire because I wouldn’t want any trouble and it is what it is.  But when I failed or got sucked in too deep, what would happen then?  Would I pull a Minister Tua and ask for help?  Gosh, knowing my personality, I doubt it.  I would just continue to hope for the best and that I’d be forgiven.  And end up dead.

  8. “The apprentice lives.” This brought so many questions with it.  Did Ahsoka know that her and Kanan’s connection was with Darth Vader?  Vader definitely knew it was Ahsoka, hence those words.  All Ahoska does is faint, yet she gets even more quiet for the rest of the episode and seems very unsettled.  What does this mean??

I really wish most of Season One was like this first episode.  I couldn’t help but love almost every minute…even Lando’s random appearance didn’t completely rankle me.

ahsoka star wars rebels

If you saw the premiere, what did you think?  Share!

Costuming & Characters: Part I – Princess Leia (Essay)

How do costumes define the characters in Star Wars?  This idea has been mulling around in my head for a while, since I had a brief discussion with Mei Mei in the comments of my blog on planets.  This is more of an essay than a blog post, but well worth the read if you’re interested.  I promise my posts on Luke and Han will be much shorter as there is not as much to discuss.

I think Lucas made very deliberate choices with his costumes on each of the three main characters in the original trilogy and made sure that what they were clothed in also reflected either a) their personality, b) their development as a character, or c) their environment.  The latter is the most obvious and almost always true, but I think it’s interesting how color and shape can also dictate a deeper look into who they are.

So I decided to split this up into a three part series and examine the most obvious choices of characters: Luke, Leia, and Han.  I know nothing about costume fabrics so that area will remain untouched.

On the surface, Princess Leia’s costumes remain almost always the same in terms of color.  In the entirety of A New Hope, she is wearing white.  There is only one costume change and that comes in during the last two minutes of the movie.

During the Empire Strikes Back, she steps it up a notch and has four costume changes.  She starts off with this one piece, white snowsuit with an off-white vest.  This is a slight change from ANH, as this is a pant snowsuit and not a dress, paired with almost knee-high boots (grey/white color).  She stays in that for the majority of the movie, until she gets to Bespin, where she changes into a deep red long sleeve short dress, with matching pants underneath and a tan vest/long sleeveless cloak.  She’s only in this briefly; as soon as Solo is captured, she is once again in her pant snowsuit, without the matching vest.  This time she is in white heels as opposed to boots.  At the end of the movie, she is surprisingly back in the same dress we see her in for the majority of ANH.

The Return of the Jedi sees five costume changes, but I am going to ignore her disguise as Boushh as that was her imposing as someone else.  If we ignore Boushh, she starts off in the famous metal bikini made of gold and maroon colors with grey shoes.  She transitions to her Endor outfit with light blue pants, black boots, tan shirt and grey vest, but while on Endor she dons a camouflage cape to blend in with the forest.  When with the Ewoks, she has a tan, rustic, homespun brown dress before she changes back into Endor gear, before finally ending the movie with the Ewok dress once again.

Now we have a good foundation at looking at Leia as a character and understanding how her costumes reflect her.

The first thing that always comes to mind with Leia and her costumes are:

  • She has many white costumes, and
  • Her costumes do not reveal a lot of skin, barring the slave costume which I will get into later.

Throughout mythology, white symbolizes goodness, purity, and light.  It is associated with perfection and safety.  Most of the time, it has a positive connotation.  This makes sense for Leia’s character, as Lucas wants us to see her as the Princess in need of rescuing in the first film.  This could also be why he puts her in a dress; as the Trilogy continues, Leia is more often found in pants.  He follows the standard fairytale format in ANH with a princess trapped away and a boy who rescue her (though, once she’s out of her cell, it seems like she does more the rescuing).  It’s way more nuanced than that but you understand the gist of it.  It wouldn’t make sense to dress Leia in any color other than white for the first film.

As we progress to the second and third film, there is more of a shift in her colors, though I would say that in ESB, she still is firmly in the white category.  The red dress-like costume when she is in Bespin is an abnormality, but it’s easy to see why.  cloud city red

When thinking of red in your daily life, what do you think?  Stop.  Danger.  Warning.  Love.  Seduction, at times.  Courage, at times.  We can tie her Cloud City costume back to her feelings of Lando.  Leia even clearly says, “I don’t trust Lando.”  Her costume is wrapped up in her feelings of Lando and his carnal feelings for her.  The red from her point of view symbolizes mistrust, her sense of danger over the whole situation.  For Lando, he sees the red dress and it plays to seduction and that she wants to be wooed by him.  It generates a lustful feeling for him.  Notice how quickly Leia pulls in the lighter, long cloak as soon as Lando enters and looks her up and down?  I believe Lucas paired the red dress with the white cloak to remind us that she is still a pure, good, and safe character.  It allows Leia to pull herself into safety despite her mistrust of Lando.

As soon as Lando’s betrayal is revealed and Han is captured by Boba and the Empire, Leia is once again put into the white costume.  There’s no more questioning of her character; she is back in control and a strong beacon of light.

Why does she end in the same dress she was in during most of ANH then?  I’ve tried analyzing this but have come up short on a satisfactory explanation.  We can’t really say she’s come full circle, as this is clearly the middle chapter of the story.  I like to think that she’s dressed in that outfit that was pre-Han because Han has been taken away and we don’t know if he’ll be brought back safe.  It’s still white, but it’s a symbol of Leia alone.  Again, not happy with this, so if anyone has better ideas, please share.

As we head into Return of the Jedi, I want to talk about how conservative Leia’s clothes have been thus far.  None of them have been revealing and I think that reflects on her as a very guarded, in control person.  She has a high position in helping run the Rebellion against the Empire and does not have time for a personal life.  Princess Leia is not the let-her-hair-down (figuratively and literally) kind of girl.  She’s definitely a little uptight, or as Han would like to say, “could use a good kiss.”  Her clothing reflects that strong and guarded woman.

The one time we see her in a pretty revealing outfit is…you guessed it…the slave costume in Return of the Jedi.  I wrote leia and jabbaabout this outfit in a previous post, arguing that this outfit is not quite a sexist as some would like to believe.  In a nutshell, the reasoning is that Leia was put into this costume against her will.  This forced bikini outfit represents Leia’s vulnerability at this moment in the Original Trilogy.  Up until she is at Jabba’s Palace, we have always seen Leia in control of situations.  In ANH she ran the entire show, got everyone out of the Death Star alive, and got Artoo back to the Rebellion in one piece with the stolen plans.  In ESB, she was one of the last to leave the base and the only time she sat back was when Han took them to Cloud City – and we saw how that turned out.  But never in the entire OT do we see her stripped of her ability to have an opinion, voice, or control.  The bikini shows this like no other costume can.

The muted colors of Leia’s slave outfit are a representation of Jabba’s hold on her.  There is no white in this costume, the lightest color are the shoes, which are a dark grey.  Gold is most commonly paired with wealth, riches, and affluence.  Of course that’s what Jabba is trying to portray.  He has a rich new toy (who better than a Princess of Alderaan and leader of the Rebellion?) and he wants to show it off.  Why not deck her out in the finest?

As soon as Leia is back with the Rebellion and Jabba is dead, she once more puts on conservative clothes.  The clothes are definitely on the lighter side of the spectrum, but they are not white.  I believe the camouflage cloak is clearly designed for practical, environmental purposes and will not go into that.  As the movie continues, she never wears white again, except once as a shirt underneath the Ewok dress.  We have left the monochromatic Leia behind and have begun to see a Leia with changes in her life.

The Ewok dress is a brown color.  Yes, it was probably made from earthy materials and environmentally influenced, but it could also reflect the way her life as she knew it is changing.

She’s falling for Han.  Hard.  She learns that Luke is her brother and her father is *gasp* Darth Vader.  Knowing that she leia and hanhas Sith in her now, perhaps Lucas wanted to reflect that with these colors that almost seem like water and earth running together.  Pure water (the light, white, pure Leia) and muddy dirt (knowing she has Sith/evil in her blood) mirrors her transition as a character.  She ends the Trilogy in the brown dress which makes sense with the white peeking out.  She’s no longer the character that she was in ANH.

We see through Leia’s costumes a passage of a character that speaks volumes.  I don’t think she ever loses her goodness, strength and purity.  But she does change, especially in Return of the Jedi where we see her attachment to Han and learns about her true family history.  Lucas was smart to have her costumes mirror the change internally in an external fashion (pun!).

If you made it through this whole essay, let me know what you think about Leia and her costumes.  Did you notice something that maybe I did not bring up?  What was I right about?  What was I wrong on?

Friendship Shows Us Who We Really Are

I find that I’m really liking Star Wars Rebels.  One of the main reasons I think I love it so much is the camaraderie and friendships aboard the Ghost between all the crew members.  I love Kanan and Hera’s relationship, or more precisely: friendship.  Now, I haven’t read A New Dawn yet, but it’s sitting on my night table and is next in line once I’ve finished this epic fantasy series (for those of you who care, it’s The Kingkiller Chronicle).  So if I’m bringing something up that contradicts with the book, then I apologize.

I’ve gone into this a little bit with my “Not As Certain As Being Left Behind…” post from a year and a half ago, but I was re-thinking about friendship in Star Wars over SWCA.  The Star Wars movies are lacking some real, serious, admirable friendships.

Off the top of my head, this is what I can think of for friendships in the movies:

  1. Han and Chewie. Why it’s a bad example – Chewie has a life debt on Han.  Not that I don’t think their
    Tell me you kind of died of happiness inside when this happened. YEAH??

    Tell me you kind of died of happiness inside when this happened. YEAH??

    friendship is real or one of the best in the saga, but I don’t think their friendship stemmed from something organic.

  2. Han and Lando. Why it’s a bad example – Clearly, Lando betrayed Han.  But friendships go through rough patches, just like any relationship.  It just seems like Lando and Han were always uneasy around each other from the start.  Though I believe their friendship progressed further, we don’t really get to see it in the movies.
  3. Threepio and Artoo. Why it’s a bad example – they’re droids.  ’nuff said.
  4. Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan, Obi-Wan/Anakin, Anakin/Ahsoka. Why it’s a bad example – this is a little harder.  I have no doubt that a relationship with your Padawan breeds a great friendship.  But again, I guess I’m a little hesitant because it’s not that organic of a situation.  You are both placed together in a situation where you don’t have much of a choice.  You become friends in the way that I become friends with my co-workers…there’s no one else around, so might as well be friends with them.  And some of the friendships last a long time and are really sincere, but some are just situational.
  5. Padmé/Obi-Wan. Why it’s a bad example – I actually think this is the closest we have to a real friendship inobi wan padme Star Wars…with one tiny problem: The scenes that really exemplify her friendship with him were cut from Revenge of the Sith.  Unfortunately, a lot of the greatest Padmé scenes were cut from ROTS, but that’s a story for a different time.  I think if Padmé had lived, and if Padmé hadn’t been dealt the whole Anakin-is-her-secret-husband card, then her and Obi-Wan would have been the best example of a friendship within the movies.
  6. Anakin/Palpatine. Why it’s a bad example – Duh.  Well, at first I think it was a friendship of sorts, though Palpatine was clearly using and manipulating Anakin for his own ends.  But as soon as they became the two Sith, everything changed.  It was a relationship now based on fear, not anything sincere, that’s for sure.

the crew of the GhostBut with Star Wars Rebels, I love the crew of the Ghost because they all chose to stick together and become family.  I think it’s a great example of friendship in Star Wars.  They are all there by choice.  Every one of them can leave when they want but they choose to stay because this band of misfits are a solid group of friends that became a family.

More importantly, and I hope this never changes in the series, I love that Kanan and Hera’s friendship is not romantic.  If it was romantic at some point, then all the props to them because what’s even more amazing is that they were able to move past that and stay friends (I never figured that out with my ex’s. Ever. You break up with me and you’re dead to me.  See ya.).

But let’s suppose there was nothing romantic in their past.  It shows children, and all of us, that you can have a male/female friendship without romantic entanglements.  I think that’s missing heavily in our society.  We bombard children with ads, movies, books, and a lot of it is centered on something romantic.  Either male novels will be full of silliness that the male character gets in (ages 6-9ish) and then move toward action packed books where females play small roles (ages 10-15ish).  With female novels, it’s rare that I see a male female friendship.  Either the female is off on her own saving the world (with random love storylines thrown in) or it’s completely centered on a love story. This is not just the case with novels.  Turn on the Disney Channel or Cartoon Network and you’ll see something similar.

hera and kanan star wars rebels

Kanan and Hera show us that each can be a competent, unique person in their own right, with strengths and weaknesses, but also the ability to be best friends without falling for each other.  They are hanging out because they want to hang out, because of a situation that wasn’t forced upon them.  Not only is it so important for children to see, but I also think it’s a good reminder for us.

I really think Kanan and Hera’s friendship make the Star Wars universe a better place.